Portal of the justice authorities of the federal and state governments

Joint Commission of the Federal and States governments (Bund-Länder Commission)

The translation is currently being updated. The translated text still corresponds to the old version.

Although the digital age didn’t started before some 15 years ago, the roots of the joint Commission of the Federal and States Governments for the Information Technology in the Judiciary go back far beyond that.

As early as in 1969, the justice ministers in the federal government and in the federal states of what then was West Germany realized the enormous potential of the new technology called electronic data processing. At a Conference of Ministers of Justice on 30th and 31 May 1969 they agreed to create a joint commission that should link up the information technology activities of justice administration bodies on the level of the federal government with those in the federal states. Thus the joint Commission of the Federal and States Governments for the Information Technology in the Judiciary was born which back then was first called a “joint Commission for Data Processing and Rationalization). Therefore, the judiciary – always criticized as being “outdated” – became not just an up-to-date agency, but was ahead of its time even back then.

When in 2009 the lawmakers formed a binding framework for the planning, creation and operation of IT systems by adopting Section 91c of the German Constitution, the judiciary at that time, therefore, was able to draw on a long-time tradition of good cooperation between the federal states.

In June 2012, the Commission adopted the role of a permanent working group from E-Justice-Council (the continuative link is currently available in German only) that had been newly created in June 2012. Since then it has been operating in this new form.

The tasks the Commission has been confronted with have been constantly growing ever since. The judiciary is now undergoing a major process of changes and modernization. The digitalization provides new chances that should be exploited and on the other hands it also creates new risks that should be faced as specific challenges.

Based on many years of a tradition as a community of shared values, in which dealing in partnership lies in the common interest of all participating parties, the Commission has always been able to successfully meet these demands. This success story is the best foundation which is required to actively, farsightedly and responsibly meet the big challenges that are lying ahead.

 

Alexander Wiemerslage

Head of Information and Communication Technology (IT) and Electronic Legal Communication Division at the Justice Ministry of Lower Saxony

Chairman of the joint Commission of the Federal and States Governments for the Information Technology in the Judiciary